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.s. history that have transformed the laws of the country and illuminated protections afforded to religion in the u.s. constitution. this interview, part of booktv's college series, was recorded at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. it's about 20 minutes. >> host: university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of our nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment beg
they look to the devil and the titis -- a very complex religion well structured. they looked among the titis and the sound issue, dtt called issue. i often refer to issue as the imminent hearing condition. the issue is on project boasts. issue exists to teach humanity. there's always more than one side to an issue. more than one face to the reality, two to shoot aware of appearances. issue is the embodiment of the lesson embedded in such things. i want to teach about their folly and being dogmatic about any issue in a very painful way. like a good teacher, symbolic for those who haven't learned, looking at both sides of the question. his places at the crossroads, where he get confused. which rose to take at a crossroads? sound issue this is not allowed in the house. his places always at the doorstep because it's just too temperamental. before you do anything come and before you were shaped any of the titis, make sure you set aside a morsel for the messenger of the titis. you can deliver the message straight into the streets, but you may deliver it in a way without lying that makes you misint
human beings. so they look for the devil and look among the deities, a very complex religion. very elaborate, very well structured, and they looked among the deities, and they found be issue, the deity called issue. who's issue? i often refer to issue as the imminent -- [inaudible] of the human condition. why do i call him that? issue is an unpredictable spirit. issue exists to teach humanity, but there's always more than one side to an issue. more than one face to any reality. teaches you beware of appearances. the best laid plans of mice and men, etc., issue is the embodiment of the lesson gained by such things. and when you teach humanity about the folly in -- [inaudible] or being dogmatic about any issue, it tends to do it in a rather painful way, you know, hike a good teacher armed with a cane, symbolic cane for adults who haven't learned the wisdom of looking at both sides of a question. and his places are the crossroads where, of course, which is the place where human beings get confused. which road do you take at a crossroads? issue's so mischievous that in the overall pant
. this is the history of africa and it goes back a couple of centuries. but today, to be a follower of the religion is to earn a death sentence in certain parts of nigeria. and of course, christians respond in kind with their colleagues in reprisal. put that level of intolerance based on ignorance has raised that such a pitch that if you open the papers at any time in nigeria of the church has been burned down, worshipers machine gunned, a mosque was burned down and worshipers were bombed out of existence. even within the muslim religion there are different grades of purity. one side considers the other not sufficient so therefore deserving of criminal censorship. but then i jeers censorship never has one single issue that leads to total destabilization of society. >> booktv is here at the national press club author night joining us now is the author of a first cameraman. what is your association with the obama administration? >> in 2008 on the campaign i was a personal videographer that i carried through the first two and a half years of the white house. the last cycle i did not work on the campai
. i had more than one teacher whose religion was elliott's four quartets and we learned attitude from yates and the greek anthology. we wanted to come proud, overnight and laughing. i loved this epitaph of an ancient greek sailor. in the greek anthology translation by dudley fits, wonderful teacher, tomorrow the wind will have fallen, tomorrow i will be safe in arbor, tomorrow i said and death spoke in that little word, stranger, this is the nemesis of the spoken word, bite back the daring tongue that would say tomorrow. we marvel that keeps's ability to imagine what it would feel like to be a billiard ball rolling across the smooth table. we hundred for lives that had the emotional range of shakespeare's sonnets. if we were going to be saved we knew it would be by literature. there was a french historian who put it best for me as i tried in my mid 40s to turn from biography to life writing, history, you could think he meant to include biography and fiction, history, he said, is not a narrative, it is not analysis, it is a resurrection. this is some of what brenda wineapple has in min
and the catcher in the rye and of course there is poetry. i had more than one teacher whose religion was elliott's four quartets. and the learned attitude from yates and from the greek anthology. we wanted to come proud open night and laughing. and i love this epitaph of any change greek sailor. in a greek anthology translation from a wonderful teacher. tomorrow the wind will have fallen. tomorrow i will be safe that harbored. tomorrow i said and death spoken out little word. oh stranger this is the nemesis of the spoken word. fight back with daring tongue i would say tomorrow. we marveled at the ability to imagine what it would feel like to be a billiard all rolling across the pool table. we hungered for lives that had emotional range of shakespeare's sonnets and if we were going to be saved we knew it would be by literature. there was the french historian jules michelet who put it is for me as i tried in my mid-40s to turn biography to life writing. history he said, and you could think that he meant to include fee and fiction, history he said is not narrative. it is not analysis. it is resurre
or bothered me about my religion. it was hard for me to give up my citizenship and i am sure in tehran is not easy to do. the man behind me in line with a hungarian who hugged me and citizens it great to be an american? i said don't know. i will tell you later. >> we opened the book with a vivid scene from 1968, you had flown to reno to get a divorce in the days before his divorce. very difficult to get a divorce back then. it had be someone's fault and it was not easy. she came back and was in a bit of a state and drove her car directly into the middle of a riot in downtown d.c.. it was the morning after the night martin luther king was assassinated in a city of people here who note exploded. the 1960s and 1968 was a time of major turmoil in the united states and also a huge time of change in your life because you did something that was difficult, you got a divorce after a very long marriage and it was the time when the women's movement was really beginning to get underway in united states but i was impressed that you were not inspired by the women's movement, it was something else. >
that today, to be a follower of the yoruba religion is to earn the death sentence in certain parts of nigeria. christians also earned the death sentence in certain parts of nigeria and christians respond in kind and set upon the muslim community. but the level of intolerance based on ignorance has enriched such -- european papers any time in nigeria find out the church has been burned down, worshipers are machine guns, the mosque has been burned down, bombed out of existence because even within the muslim religion there are different degrees of purity. once i consider the other side not sufficiently pure and therefore deserving censorship, the nigerian situation is more complicated as in other societies. there's never one single issue that needs to this total stabilization of society. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. .. >> thank you, amanda. um, okay. i wrote a little something here, and i can get my glasses on and read it -- oh, and i've also got it, wait a minute, it's in the kindle. so let's see if i can read it in the kindle. but it's this little t
in the distinction between race and religion and etc. so by giving it a name and it's starting to have its own life. i'm jumping ahead a little bit, but in 1934, roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress. the president would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and it was called the state of the union. a lot of these terms were sort of created by presidents -- we think they are from day one. in fact, they are ones that have been added later. and again, some of them are just wonderful. just jumping to a couple, zachary taylor created the term first lady. he applied it to dolly madison but it was the first that anyone had ever used that term. the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was jumping around a little bit and woodrow wilson had potomac fever, which was something that harry truman loved to quote. politics is adjourned was woodrow wilson, watchful waiting was very appropriate. first with his relationship with dictatorship in mexico, feeling that we should go in and intervene wilson said no, this is watch and wait. once the war started, world war i, that was
was a graduate of princeton prewar and during the war. buckley says yale is insufficiently respectful of religion despite its religious heritage and the heritage of most elite academia in america and also they don't present the free enterprise side of economics. they are too keynesian and quasi-socialist. rusher agreed with all of that, but i think the greater affinity with buckley can be seen and buckley and his brother-in-law rent facelle's 1954 book in which they say yeah mccarthy has been a little too rough. he has made some errors in judgment but that causes really, really important and he is being treated unfairly. that is exactly where rusher, that's exactly where russian is in 1954 and 55 and 56. in the years where he turns from generic young republican republicanism to hard movement conservatism. there was a bit of a conservative movement before buckley founded the "national review" in 1955 that it was sort of, it was disorganized. the polite term might be entrepreneurial individualistic. whittaker chambers had another way to describe it. he said it was people popping out like rabbits. y
sense is that regardless of culture, race religion try some commonality. these essential human truth compassion and hope some moral precepts are universal. just go and somebody is another variation he said in the speech that made famous in the 2004 keynote address at the democratic national convention in boston, where he said there's a red states blue states, but the united states. he presented himself as the personification of that notion. his presidency has been a rude awakening in terms of how far you can take that. so he has been dealing with that. the promise and frustrations of that idea ever sense. as i'm sure we'll both be experiencing the telephone calls, for the show. >> host: your book ends in 1989, "barack obama: the story." he said there's another volume coming? >> guest: added y2k committed to 40 years of robert caro, so assertive cat that on the down low, but i had every intention and i've done a lot of reporting that the later years, which influences the book even though they're not in it. and i don't want to do a quickie. i tried a rate for history documents coming o
, insufficiently respectful of religion despite its, you know, religious heritage can the religious heritage of most of elite academia in america. also they don't present the free enterprise side of economics. they're too keynesian, they're quasi-socialist. okay, rusher agreed with all that. but i think the greater affinity with buckley can be seen in buckley and his brother-in-law brent bozell's 1954 book "mccarthy and his enemies" in which they say, yeah, mccarthy's opinion a little too rough, he's made some errors of judgment, but that cause is really, really important, and he's being treated unfairly. that's exactly where rusher, that's exactly where rusher is in 1954-'55, '56 in the years where he turns from generic young republican republicanism to hard movement conservativism. there was a bit of a conservative movement even before buckley founded "national review" in 955, but it was -- 1955, but it was sort of, it was a little disorganized. it was disorganized, it was -- the polite term might be entrepreneurial, individualistic. whitaker chambers had another way of describing it, he s
of religion despite their religious heritage of the academe in america. also they don't prevent. their cause i socialists. rusher agreed with all of that. but, i think a greater affinity with buckley can be seen in buckley and his brother-in-law's 1954 book mccarthy and his enemies she's made some errors in judgment but that cause is really important and he is being treated unfairly. that is exactly where rusher is in 1954, 55, 56. in the years where he turns from generic young republican republican as some to the hard movement conservatism. there was a bit of the conservative movement even before he founded the "national review" in 1955, but it was sort of -- it was disorganized, by the blight termite might be entrepreneurial individualistic. whitaker chambers had another way of describing it. it was like people popping out like rabbits. you never knew where they were coming from or where they were going. we might see a little of this today now and then. rusher is absolutely thrilled to hear that there is going to be a conservative weekly magazine. at the time, it was weakly. so when he hears
and religion etc.. as opposed to judging the size of eggs and being discriminate so by giving it a name, by giving it a name that started to have its own life. the ability of a president to name something and i'm jumping ahead a little bit but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress. it was from day one in this country and the year we give an address to the nation and the congress. roosevelt in 1934 set on set on getting it in the many calls at the state of the union. a lot of these terms which were created by presidents we think are there from day one and in fact they are ones that have been in it later. and again some of them are just wonderful. let me just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term first lady. that did not exist in the applied it to dolley madison and the first that anyone had used that term. he referred to as the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was keep the ball rolling. jumping around a little bit but woodrow wilson had potomac fever which was something that harry truman loved to quote. politics is adjourned w
in those da y when given the -- between franco and the vatican, which made serviery other religion illegal begin that chapter with a funny stormed i am in a bar in northen spain and the guys are trying to teach me how to pour the wonderful cider, the hard cider which perhaps you know -- you hold the bottle this wg your head, you have a glass with a very big opened last pointing out and the cider is supposed to hit the outside and bounce in and iite trying to do that and most of it is running down my pants all over the floor. little bit is going into the glass and one of the guys sa y to me -ke twe are pretty well drunk by this time and one of the unn y sg catholic or atheist? those seemed to be the only possibilities. i said no, i am neither a catholic nor an atheist. no kidding? you must be protestant. why would you think that? servierybody an american governt -- that is not true either. john kennedy -- so i said, what are you? i am jewish. you couldn't be jewish. he ghy couldn't i be it? r aou don't have any horns. i joked, i said i had some cut off when i came into the ford yn service.
in gold and religion. why spices. why were spices so valuable back then? it wasn't just that food was terrible in europe, it was. all the spices, each new exotic spice was thought to have certain properties, they might make you feel a bit more randy. how shall i put this? each of these new spices were the niagara of the day so that is one of the reasons his trade became so valuable. so after the conquest and colonization the settlers made fortunes exporting drugs back to europe and consuming them in this hemisphere as well and buy drugs i mean sugar which many people consider a drug, where we get rum from, definitely a drug, coffee, tobacco, and these aphrodisiac spices. these things became the developmental engine for hemispheric development. vast fortunes were created. think about where we are today, washington d.c. virginia, maryland. these were all drugs. the first time a lot of these drugs are introduced back to europe people looked at them with revulsion. tobacco. a bizarre thing. why would you put fire and smoke in your mouth? coffee was thought to be subversive. it had the
. it defined their culture, it shaped their religion, it even shaped their individual personalities. so slavery was central to southern life. but slavery was also an institution, a form of property that contained a problem, a problem for the masters. this valuable form of property was capable of thinking, capable of yearning for freedom and capable of acting upon that yearning. joshua spieled, a kentucky friend owner who was a friend of abraham lincoln's, put it this way: slave property is unlike any other. it is the only property in the world that has locomotion with a mind to control it. and he went on to say that's why they were so sensitive about any outside interference with it. slave property was valuable, but control over it seemed tenuous. and the masters' fear about that fact left them convinced that their laborers could be kept controlled and work profitably only if they were kept uneducated, uninformed, isolated from dangerous influences, closely watched, intimidated and convinced that or tear status as -- that their status as slaves was permanent and up changeable. unchangeable. to
a shortcut and he was interested in gold and spending religion, but primarily it is about spaces. whatever space is so valuable that then? wasn't just the food was terrible in europe. and it was, but each new exotic spice was thought to have certain properties. each of these new spaces where the today. so that's one of the reasons by the trade became so valuable and people risk their lives to explore these themes. so after the conquest and colonization, exporting drugs back to europe in this hemisphere as well. by drugs i mean sugar, which many people consider a job, where we get from is definitely a drug. coffee, tobacco, tea and aphrodisiac spaces. these things became the developmental and system. vast fortunes were created. think about where we are today. what was the colonial economy? these are all drugs. .. and now we have turkish coffee, english tea time and of course of the fortunes that drove a lot in the european development. and so, long story short the reason have the world got colonized in some ways is because a bunch of old white men in europe couldn't get up so there you have
. it was the first time discrimination had ever been used in the distinction between race, religion, etc., discrimination in the fact as opposed to judging the size of eggs or something, being discriminate. and so by giving it a name, by giving it a fame it started -- a name it started to have it own life. the ability of a president to name something, i'm jumping ahead a little bit, but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress and was from day one in this country the president at the beginning of the year would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and roosevelt in 1934 says, oh, i'll give it a name, calls it the state of the union. so a lot of these terms which are sort of created by presidents we think are, um, they are from day one. in fact, they're ones that have been added later. and, again, some of them are just wonderful. i mean, i'll just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term "first lady." he applied it to dolly madison. that was the first anyone had ever used that term. he said the first lady of the land. benjamin ha
makes religion into an instrument of hatred like j.b. stoner, there are plenty of those. they are near the top of the list. c-span: here is the book. second in the three volume series by taylor branch. this one is called "pillar of fire america in the king years 1963-1965." thank you. >> guest: thank you, brian. >>> you are watching book tv on c-span2. tonight we are at the national press club in washington, d.c. for their annual authors night and we are pleased to be joined here by robert merry who is the author of "where they stand the american presidents in the eyes of voters and historians." mr. merry, do we tend to like our presidents? >> i think the american people love their presidents. they love the presidency. but when they have a president that has not succeeded to the judge a failure, they vary on sentimentally cast them aside and that is our system to read that is what they were invited to do by the founders and by the constitution. >> do we have a short patience? >> we understand the constitution gave them hiring and firing authority over these guys every four years. so th
of religion. and so we have this enormous, tragic history that all of us confront from whatever our backgrounds are whether we're white, black, hispanic, asian, whether we're muslim, jew or christian. the notion that, in fact, in the words of a great writer who happened to win a nobel prize, william faulkner, he said the past is never dead and buried, it isn't even past. and i think that all of us are confronting constantly our history. we're confronting the history of slavery in this country. we're confronting the history and problems that arose as a consequence of colonialism. we're confronting those scars of violence and oppression and struggle and difficulty and hope not only on the larger canvas of history, but also within our own families. and for me it was not entirely obvious how, in fact, i was going to be able to integrate and pull together all those different strands in my life. so part of my challenge growing up was to figure out how do i function as someone who is black but also has white blood in me, how do i function as somebody who with is american and takes pride an
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21